Developer Economics 2012_visionmobile.com

Our research is based on an online survey of 1,500+ developers from across the globe, as well as 20 qualitative interviews. Our sample was global, including developers not just from North America, Europe and Asia, but also from Africa, Oceania and Latin America.

Here are some of the many insights from the report:

– The average per-app revenue is in the range of $1,200-$3,900 per month, depending on platform
– Irrespective of which platform they primarily use, the majority of developers (57%) plan to adopt Windows Phone
– Tablets are now a mainstream screen for developers: more than 50% of developers are now targeting tablets, with iOS developers most likely (74%) to do so
– North America tops app demand with 41% of developers indicating this is a top-3 download region, irrespective of their region of origin Read More

How to make money from mobile apps_capitalfm.co.ke

Stephen Maingi is a young Kenyan developer with a great entrepreneurial spirit and many good ideas. Through the Nokia Store, he has managed to convert his ideas into cash; netting around Ksh100,000 per month from downloads.

Stephen’s journey began in 2009 when he started application development, all self-taught by using the internet for resources. Shortly thereafter, he developed a suite of 14 applications called Kyuste Mobile Suite.

The young Kenyan is one of the few – but growing developers – monetizing their apps by making use of readily available online tools and app stores, giving them access to millions of app users. Read More

Africa finally pays its own way — with a mobile phone

Mobile is big. Even bigger than you think. No technology in the history of mankind has achieved the reach and penetration globally that rivals that of the mobile phone. According to the International Telecommunications Union, at the end of 2011, there were approximately six billion mobile phone subscriptions. This is equivalent to 87% of the world’s population and a huge increase from 5.4-billion in 2010 and 4.7-billion mobile subscriptions in 2009.

Initial excitement about the rise of the mobile phone was dominated by talk of the rise of mobile voice at the expense of fixed line operators, and then more recently by the second most used service on a mobile phone — mobile messaging, dominated by SMS. What is currently generating the most interest in mobile is the rise of mobile money.

Africa finally pays its own way — with a mobile phone

Africa

Mobile is big. Even bigger than you think. No technology in the history of mankind has achieved the reach and penetration globally that rivals that of the mobile phone. According to the International Telecommunications Union, at the end of 2011, there were approximately six billion mobile phone subscriptions. This is equivalent to 87% of the world’s population and a huge increase from 5.4-billion in 2010 and 4.7-billion mobile subscriptions in 2009.

Initial excitement about the rise of the mobile phone was dominated by talk of the rise of mobile voice at the expense of fixed line operators, and then more recently by the second most used service on a mobile phone — mobile messaging, dominated by SMS. What is currently generating the most interest in mobile is the rise of mobile money.

Africa Ahead of Most of Europe with 4G Service_blackenterprise.com

Africa is currently the fastest-growing mobile market; thus far, countries such as Liberia, Nigeria and Tanzania are 4G Internet efficient

As the continent of Africa grows economically, its citizens work hard in many sectors to help the continent shed the label of “developing” in order to be considered “developed.” All over Africa, independent nations are taking the next step to global communication that could possibly change the way that the world interacts with them.

“It is the fastest-growing mobile market in the world and the biggest after China,” the BBC reported in 2011, “…there will be more than 735 million subscribers by the end of 2012.” With those statistics, it is no surprise that some countries in Africa have become connected to 4G internet before many countries in Europe. Read More